Sunday, March 26, 2017

Featured Author: Saraswati Nagpal

One of the reading options in Indian Epics is Saraswati Nagpal's graphic novel entitled Sita: Daughter of the Earth, the first Indian graphic novel to be shortlisted for the Stan Lee Excelsior Award.


Nagpal has also written a graphic novel about the heroine of the Mahabharata, Draupadi: Fire-Born Princess.


Although these two graphic novels are written by the same author, they are illustrated by different artists, so that will give you a great opportunity to think about the contributions that the author and the illustrator both make to your experience of a graphic novel.

Saraswati Nagpal was born in 1980, and I have copied below a brief biography which I found at her Amazon Author page:
Since she can remember, Saraswati has been in love with words. As a child, she used to read books everywhere, anywhere and all the time. Her first published work, the graphic novel 'Sita, Daughter of the Earth' is the first Indian graphic novel to be shortlisted for the Stan Lee Excelsior Award (2012). She is working on more graphic novels for young adults, as well as on her first fantasy fiction novel. Saraswati is also an educator who believes in a fun classroom and joyful learning. All the children she teaches and meets inspire her to re-tell old stories and make up magical new ones.  Other than writing, she adores dancing, animals and the colour purple. She currently spends her time between mystical India and beautiful South Africa. In Hindu or Vedic lore, Saraswati is the serene goddess of speech, art and wisdom. Saraswati is very glad to be named after her.
This photograph is from The Serene Swan, a musical project by Saraswati and her brother, Sai Ganesh Nagpal.


Here is their performance of the Gayatri Mantra, and you might also enjoy this article that Nagpal wrote for The Atlantic magazine:  Princesses Can, in Fact, Be Role Models for Little Girls.

2 comments:

  1. Hi, Laura. It's great to know that readers offer and explore my books. Thanks for passing on the stories.

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    1. Oh, I just noticed this comment: how nice to meet you online like this! One of my students chose to read your Sita during the Ramayana part of the semester and loved it! I am guessing she will be reading the Draupadi book in the second half of the semester... and thanks so much for your comment! I am so glad to have your stories to share with my class!

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